Friday, December 02, 2011

Meditators 'R' Us

The how to meditate for kids video received a bit of a mixed response; lots of people have said how useful it will be, which is honestly what I expected - hence the effort put into making it. Some people were turned off by it, most especially the 15 seconds mentioning that meditators can gain magical powers, which I guess is a taboo among secularists. But it's all good; this letter and picture alone make the video worthwhile:



I'm watching the video you made for kids over and over (with my kids) because that's the level I am at for understanding and practicing meditation.

I'm really impressed by how much my kids love it. My son is completely captivated with it. My daughter doesn't quite understand the point yet. But she is 7 and up until she was 5 she used to claim that she never ever slept because she was only aware of being awake. We always laughed when she said this and eventually she realized what sleep was. So I think she will also come to understand the goal of meditation. For now, she forgets the word and calls it hesitation. My son says, "let's meditate" and she says, "yeah, let's hesitate." Another funny thing is that my kids noticed your accent right away.

My daughter says you have a texture to your speech. I wonder where she came up with that. I told them you have a pretty typical Canadian accent and they were just so confused. I explained that Canada is another country and they speak English slightly differently there. In any case, they like to hear you talk.

My son wants to meditate every chance he gets so I expect to see a lot from that. Even though my daughter doesn't seem to know what the point of meditation is, this morning on the way to school she said, "I feel calm." As you say, this is the value of meditation, to be aware of what you are experiencing. I also heard her last night saying, "happy, happy, happy." So I think she is just going with it without fully understanding.






yo have daharo bhikkhu, yuñjati buddhasāsane.
somaṃ lokaṃ pabhāseti, abbhā muttova candimā.

Who, though young, see the dangers in negligence and
devote themselves to the teachings of the enlightened,
They light up this world like the moon freed from the clouds.

-- Dhp. 382