Monday, August 22, 2005

Samyutta Nikaaya 2.1.2.2

The Discourse to Phagguna Top-Knot

In Savathi -

"There are these four nutriments, o Bhikkhus, for the subsistence of those beings who have already become, or for the support of those seeking becoming. Which four? Material food ? coarse or refined, contact as the second, mental volition as the third, consciousness as the fourth. There are indeed, o Bhikkhus, these four nutriments for the subsistence of those beings who have already become, or for the support of those seeking becoming."

Thus said, the Venerable Phagguna Top-Knot said this to the Blessed One: ?Who, indeed, venerable sir, uses consciousness as nutriment??

?This is not a proper question,? said the Blessed One. ?I don?t say ?uses as nutriment.? And [only] if I were to say ?uses as nutriment,? there it would be a proper question: ?Who, indeed, venerable sir, uses it as nutriment?? And this I do not say. Me not saying this, whoever should ask: ?For what, indeed, Venerable Sir, is consciousness a nutriment?? This is a proper question. There, the proper explanation is: 'The nutriment of consciousness is a condition for future becoming and rebirth. In that being, if there is the six-sense base, then from the condition of the six-sense base is contact.'"

"Who, indeed, Venerable Sir, comes in contact??

?This is not a proper question,? said the Blessed One. ?I don?t say ?comes in contact.? And [only] if I were to say ?one comes in contact,? there it would be a proper question: ?Who, indeed, venerable sir, comes in contact?? And this I do not say. Me not saying this, whoever should ask: ?From what condition, indeed, Venerable Sir, is contact?? This is a proper question. There, the proper explanation is: ?From the six-sense base as a condition comes contact. From the condition of contact are feelings.?

?Who, indeed, Venerable Sir, feels??

?This is not a proper question,? said the Blessed One. ?I don?t say ?feels.? And [only] if I were to say ?one comes in contact,? there it would be a proper question: ?Who, indeed, venerable sir, feels?? And this I do not say. Me not saying this, whoever should ask: ?From what condition, indeed, Venerable Sir, is contact?? This is a proper question. There, the proper explanation is: ?From the condition of contact come feelings. From the condition of feelings is craving.?


?Who, indeed, Venerable Sir, craves??

?This is not a proper question,? said the Blessed One. ?I don?t say ?craves.? And [only] if I were to say ?craves,? there it would be a proper question: ?Who, indeed, venerable sir, craves?? And this I do not say. Me not saying this, whoever should ask: ?From what condition, indeed, Venerable Sir, is craving?? This is a proper question. There, the proper explanation is: ?From the condition of feelings comes craving. From the condition of craving is clinging.?

?Who, indeed, Venerable Sir, clings??

?This is not a proper question,? said the Blessed One. ?I don?t say ?clings.? And [only] if I were to say ?clings,? there it would be a proper question: ?Who, indeed, venerable sir, clings?? And this I do not say. Me not saying this, whoever should ask: ?From what condition, indeed, Venerable Sir, is clinging?? This is a proper question. There, the proper explanation is: ?From the condition of craving comes clinging. From the condition of clinging is becoming.?

From the condition of becoming is birth. From the condition of birth are old-age and death, sorrow, lamentation, pain, suffering and grief arise together. Thus is the production of this entire mass of suffering. But verily, Phagguna, from the cessation of passion for the six bases of contact without remainder comes the cessation of contact.

From the cessation of contact comes the cessation of feelings.

From the cessation of feelings comes the cessation of craving.

From the cessation of craving comes the cessation of clinging.

From the cessation of clinging comes the cessation of becoming.

From the cessation of becoming comes the cessation of birth.

From the cessation of birth comes the cessation of old-age and death, and sorrow, lamentation, pain, suffering and grief cease. Thus is the cessation of this entire mass of suffering.?